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queeroticomics:

inkmaggot:

I made a flyer for QORDS, a queer oriented summer camp in NC. The camp looks super cool and I’m really glad it exists for kids today. 
(colour version to come, probs…)

Start planning for next summer!

queeroticomics:

inkmaggot:

I made a flyer for QORDS, a queer oriented summer camp in NC. The camp looks super cool and I’m really glad it exists for kids today. 

(colour version to come, probs…)

Start planning for next summer!

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

Quote
"Black women have had to develop a larger vision of our society than perhaps any other group. They have had to understand white men, white women, and black men. And they have had to understand themselves. When black women win victories, it is a boost for virtually every segment of society."

- Angela Davis, activist, author, educator

Happy 70th birthday to one of my favourite sheroes ever! 

(via night-catches-us)

(via blackaudacity)

Tags: gif
Link

thesubversivesound:

Fucks sake….

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ucsdcancer:

Exercise and Cancer
For years we’ve known that exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle by keeping us strong and reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It releases endorphins that make us feel better, physically and mentally – even if when we’re huffing and puffing we’re feeling a little tired.
We also know that physical activity is associated with reduced risk of colon, breast, uterine, lung and prostate cancers. But having cancer doesn’t change the equation. Indeed, for patients diagnosed with and treated for cancer, a life of regular physical activity can become even more critical to having a life with quality.
Physical activity is a critical component of energy balance, a term researchers use to describe how weight, diet and physical activity influence health. Indeed, researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are currently conducting a pair of studies to assess the effects of healthy diets and exercise programs on women at risk of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors. 
In a seminal series of papers published in 2012 in the journal Lancet, scientists from multiple institutions, including the UC San Diego, concluded that physical inactivity could explain more than 5 million deaths worldwide each year — a number comparable to mortality figures associated with smoking.
“A surprising finding was that inactivity explains 10 percent of deaths from both breast cancer and prostate cancer,” said Jim Sallis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine and director of the Active Living Research program at UC San Diego. “Thus physical inactivity is a major contributor to common cancers of men and women.”
Regular exercise prevents obesity, which increases a person’s risk of a host of different cancers. It helps reduce inflammation, also linked to cancer, while boosting the body’s immune system function, which helps prevent cancer.
How much exercise do you need?The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention broadly recommends adults engage in “moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week” (about 30 minutes per day) or “vigorous-intensity” exercise for at least 75 minutes per week. The former is defined as activities like walking briskly, dancing or riding a bike on flat terrain. The latter refers to stuff like race-walking, high-impact aerobics, robustly climbing stairs or participating in fast-moving sports like basketball or soccer.
The best time to begin a lifelong anti-cancer exercise program is today, right now. Once you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, the best time is still today, right now. Often, patients become sedentary after a cancer diagnosis and treatment. They’re going through or have been through a lot. It might seem too much to launch into an exercise regimen. People tend to slow down.
Don’t.
As contrary as it may seem, physical activity is the most effective long-term solution to fatigue, a common characteristic of cancer and its treatment. How and how much you exercise while undergoing cancer treatment depends upon you, your condition, treatment protocols and your doctor. You may need to take special care to monitor issues like blood counts, hydration or new or unexplained symptoms.
Exercise for some cancer patients can carry a slightly higher risk for heart problems. You’ll likely need to adjust your intensity — at least at first. You’ll have to adapt. For example, older cancer patients with impacted bones or problems like arthritis or peripheral neuropathy (numbness in hands or feet) should only do exercises with minimal risk of falling or injury. Patients undergoing radiation should not expose treated skin to excessive sunlight or chlorine in swimming pools.
Regular exercise boosts cancer survivorship. One study, for example, found that women diagnosed with breast cancer who exercised moderately (the equivalent of walking three to five hours per week at an average pace) had better survival rates than comparable sedentary patients. Physical activity has also been shown to help patients cope psychologically with the rigors of their disease and treatment.

 

ucsdcancer:

Exercise and Cancer

For years we’ve known that exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle by keeping us strong and reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It releases endorphins that make us feel better, physically and mentally – even if when we’re huffing and puffing we’re feeling a little tired.

We also know that physical activity is associated with reduced risk of colon, breast, uterine, lung and prostate cancers. But having cancer doesn’t change the equation. Indeed, for patients diagnosed with and treated for cancer, a life of regular physical activity can become even more critical to having a life with quality.

Physical activity is a critical component of energy balance, a term researchers use to describe how weight, diet and physical activity influence health. Indeed, researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are currently conducting a pair of studies to assess the effects of healthy diets and exercise programs on women at risk of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors. 

In a seminal series of papers published in 2012 in the journal Lancet, scientists from multiple institutions, including the UC San Diego, concluded that physical inactivity could explain more than 5 million deaths worldwide each year — a number comparable to mortality figures associated with smoking.

“A surprising finding was that inactivity explains 10 percent of deaths from both breast cancer and prostate cancer,” said Jim Sallis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine and director of the Active Living Research program at UC San Diego. “Thus physical inactivity is a major contributor to common cancers of men and women.”

Regular exercise prevents obesity, which increases a person’s risk of a host of different cancers. It helps reduce inflammation, also linked to cancer, while boosting the body’s immune system function, which helps prevent cancer.

How much exercise do you need?The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention broadly recommends adults engage in “moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week” (about 30 minutes per day) or “vigorous-intensity” exercise for at least 75 minutes per week. The former is defined as activities like walking briskly, dancing or riding a bike on flat terrain. The latter refers to stuff like race-walking, high-impact aerobics, robustly climbing stairs or participating in fast-moving sports like basketball or soccer.

The best time to begin a lifelong anti-cancer exercise program is today, right now. Once you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, the best time is still today, right now. Often, patients become sedentary after a cancer diagnosis and treatment. They’re going through or have been through a lot. It might seem too much to launch into an exercise regimen. People tend to slow down.

Don’t.

As contrary as it may seem, physical activity is the most effective long-term solution to fatigue, a common characteristic of cancer and its treatment. How and how much you exercise while undergoing cancer treatment depends upon you, your condition, treatment protocols and your doctor. You may need to take special care to monitor issues like blood counts, hydration or new or unexplained symptoms.

Exercise for some cancer patients can carry a slightly higher risk for heart problems. You’ll likely need to adjust your intensity — at least at first. You’ll have to adapt. For example, older cancer patients with impacted bones or problems like arthritis or peripheral neuropathy (numbness in hands or feet) should only do exercises with minimal risk of falling or injury. Patients undergoing radiation should not expose treated skin to excessive sunlight or chlorine in swimming pools.

Regular exercise boosts cancer survivorship. One study, for example, found that women diagnosed with breast cancer who exercised moderately (the equivalent of walking three to five hours per week at an average pace) had better survival rates than comparable sedentary patients. Physical activity has also been shown to help patients cope psychologically with the rigors of their disease and treatment.

 

(via pubhealth)

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Photoset

cultureunseen:

Hiroshima and Nagasaki…

(via blackaudacity)

Photoset

ndnlogosagogo:

This, I AM SO DONE WITH YOUR HONOR AMERICAN SPORTS! LIKE YOU’R DONE, WHY ARE YOU STILL HERE!?

Ah College Ball Season, please continue to add ammo to the deletion of Native American mascots, get out of here with your “HONOR”
OSU fans not only make fun of the Trail of Tears, but hey, what about Wounded Knee? #NotYourMascot

One of the Top Comments, Why do I read these again…”Not a fan of OSU but I pretty sure that they are not referring to the actual trail of tears. They are referring to FSU crying all the way back to Florida. People need to stop being so emotional and jump on every single thing they see.”

This weekend has marked a peak in my tolerance of this mockery. I have a feeling this football season will bring title waves to this debate. Again, continue to write your mascots and logos out of history American Sports!
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eazythugsta187:

Rare Pic Of The Early NWA Crew…Dr.DRE, MC Ren & The Arabian Prince Circa 1987/1988

eazythugsta187:

Rare Pic Of The Early NWA Crew…
Dr.DRE, MC Ren & The Arabian Prince 
Circa 1987/1988

Audio

newjillswing:

I love happy, bouncy songs laced with sexual moaning in the chorus.

Tags: music
Video

harikondabolu:

harikondabolu:

APU IS A WHITE GUY DOING AN IMPRESSION OF A WHITE GUY MAKING FUN OF MY FATHER.  According to the HuffPo article "Is It Time To Retire Apu?”, Hank Azaria saw my video about Mindy Kaling & South Asian representation from Totally Biased and that line affected him. (The internet is amazing!)

"A video circulating online got to him, featuring Kondabolu…The actor credits the monologue with stirring his first misgivings. “If the only representation of Jews in our culture was Robin Williams’ impression of a Yiddish guy [from “The Birdcage,” starring both Williams and Azaria], I guess I might be upset with that too,” Azaria says.”

This has opened up a nice dialogue. Much more than I ever expected and I appreciate the fact Hank Azaria was willing to talk about it. 

P.S. I LOVE THE SIMPSONS AND I ALWAYS WILL.

I’m excited about “Every Simpsons Ever” on FXX…but still have some things to say about Apu. 

(via tiarasofspanishmoss)

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