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traveling219:

“Pleasant Green School — one -room colored school near Marlinton, W.Va.—Pocahontas Co.  It is one of the best colored schools in the County, with a capable principal holding a first-grade certificate.  All the children are Agricultural Club workers.”
1921, photo by L.W. Hine.  From the Library of Congress.

traveling219:

Pleasant Green School — one -room colored school near Marlinton, W.Va.—Pocahontas Co.  It is one of the best colored schools in the County, with a capable principal holding a first-grade certificate.  All the children are Agricultural Club workers.”

1921, photo by L.W. Hine.  From the Library of Congress.

Photo

(Source: aekwensi)

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aekwensi:

“I am not a nigga…. i am a man.”
James Baldwin

aekwensi:

“I am not a nigga…. i am a man.”

James Baldwin

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thecivilwarparlor:

Unidentified African American Woman-African American women contributed significantly in the Civil War-Instances of Several Black Women Soldiers.
While it is estimated that there were perhaps four hundred or so women soldiers in the Civil War, there are also instances of several black women soldiers. Lizzie Hoffman, reportedly enlisted in the 45th U.S. Colored Infantry. Martha Lewis is a black woman who disguised herself as a white man and served for eight months in the 8th New York Cavalry. Immediately following the war, Cathay Williams (aka “William Cathay”) enlisted and served in the 38th U.S. Infantry ( a black regiment with white officers) for two years. Cathay was 5’ 9” tall, had black hair, a black complexion and black eyes, according to the description of her recruiting officer, who failed to notice that she was also a woman. She may have been the first black woman to serve in the U.S. Regular Army and as a Buffalo Soldier. 
Read more here: http://www.examiner.com/article/african-american-women-contributed-significantly-the-civil-war

Photo from -Ambrotype/Tintype filing series (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650518 Liljenquist Family collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650519

thecivilwarparlor:

Unidentified African American Woman-African American women contributed significantly in the Civil War-Instances of Several Black Women Soldiers.

While it is estimated that there were perhaps four hundred or so women soldiers in the Civil War, there are also instances of several black women soldiers. Lizzie Hoffman, reportedly enlisted in the 45th U.S. Colored Infantry. Martha Lewis is a black woman who disguised herself as a white man and served for eight months in the 8th New York Cavalry. Immediately following the war, Cathay Williams (aka “William Cathay”) enlisted and served in the 38th U.S. Infantry ( a black regiment with white officers) for two years. Cathay was 5’ 9” tall, had black hair, a black complexion and black eyes, according to the description of her recruiting officer, who failed to notice that she was also a woman. She may have been the first black woman to serve in the U.S. Regular Army and as a Buffalo Soldier. 

Read more here: http://www.examiner.com/article/african-american-women-contributed-significantly-the-civil-war

Photo from -Ambrotype/Tintype filing series (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650518 Liljenquist Family collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650519


Link

These young people eventually learn to socially navigate both African-American and their home culture. This passing of black immigrants and first-generation black Americans as members of African-American culture results in a cross-cultural black identity, where the individual is equally invested in both African-American interests and the empowerment of their (or their parent’s) home country and the many issues that affect its native sons.

(Source: provocatoria)

Text

I always wondered why every HBCU doesn’t just automatically have a African American Studies Program. Now I know why.

manifestationsofafreemind:

http://www.theroot.com/views/hbcu-black-studies?page=0,0

This. 

And it’s a shame. 

(via ketcetera)

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vintageblackglamour:

Sarah Vaughan plays the piano as Duke Ellington and Billy Eckstine look on, circa 1950. The Newark, NJ-born Ms. Vaughan studied piano as a child and went on to win first prize at the Apollo Theater’s famous Amateur Night competition. Billy 
Eckstine was in the audience that night and before long, Ms. Vaughan would sing with Mr. Eckstine in his band. Her recording of “The Duke Ellington Songbook, Vol. 1 and 2) is still unmatched for its beauty and brilliance. Photo by Gilles Petard/Redferns.

vintageblackglamour:

Sarah Vaughan plays the piano as Duke Ellington and Billy Eckstine look on, circa 1950. The Newark, NJ-born Ms. Vaughan studied piano as a child and went on to win first prize at the Apollo Theater’s famous Amateur Night competition. Billy 

Eckstine was in the audience that night and before long, Ms. Vaughan would sing with Mr. Eckstine in his band. Her recording of “The Duke Ellington Songbook, Vol. 1 and 2) is still unmatched for its beauty and brilliance. Photo by Gilles Petard/Redferns.

(via fearfullymade-locs)

Photoset

vintagegal:

Juanita Boisseau was a dancer at The Cotton Club in the early 1930s. (x)


(via dynastylnoire)

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"

Black women are among the most steadfastly religious groups in the nation, yet it is precisely because they receive the brunt of sexualized racist stereotyping and objectification that they have become more vocal in atheist organizing. In addition, black women non-believers are continuing a long tradition (ironically fostered in the Black Church and other religious civic and charitable organizations) of community organizing and outreach. And, like their religious foremothers, they are encountering some of the same sexist opposition and resistance to women’s leadership:

[i]I believe women are at the forefront…because we’re willing to stand up and take the hit. There are quite a few men out there that could stand up but they’re not. I often detect some anti-feminist resentment that won’t respect what I have to say. One of the gentlemen in my group will say the same thing I have to say and he will be respected and I won’t. We still have the same patriarchal mindset as those in the religious community.[/i]

"

Leaving Jesus: Women of Color Beyond Faith

(via unapproachableblackchicks)

(Source: thefeministwire.com, via unapproachableblackchicks)

Photoset

Native Americans from Pow Wow in NY

(via alostbird)

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