Audio

Obie Trice - “Wake Up”

And pompous white folk think I’m just rhyming
Just designing lines, just for the sake of shining
Like I just speak violent applying to the business I’m in
Rewind & find him in a dirty ass hood with no sight of climbing
'Moving on up' was just “The Jeffersons”
Rest of us watching the ‘tube got less then them
So why you vexing him? Why you stretching him out?
He got the weapon all because his whereabouts
Born and raised, mental slaves
And I don’t see change before I’m seeing the grave
All I see is my homies corpse decay
Crying at his wake, can’t recognize his face
Face it, you’re not identifying with me
My identity distorts your visibility
Video

dylandigits:

"HIGH TECH SOUL is the first documentary to tackle the deep roots of techno music alongside the cultural history of Detroit, its birthplace. From the race riots of 1967 to the underground party scene of the late 1980s, Detroit’s economic downturn didn’t stop the invention of a new kind of music that brought international attention to its producers and their hometown."

Know your history.

Photo
ardora:

Black children standing in front of half mile concrete wall, Detroit, Michigan. This wall was built in August 1941, to separate the Black section from a white housing development going up on the other side.
Photo by John Vachon

Brief Detroit history to go with this photograph:
In the early 20th century… the city’s real estate was valuable, and jealously guarded by whites. The hundreds of thousands of blacks who migrated to work in the city’s booming auto and defense industries found that most jobs and neighborhoods were closed to them.
In the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s, working-class white ethnics bought homes and began to identify as just “white.” And being white meant keeping blacks, suffering from an extreme housing shortage, away from white neighborhoods and jobs. Along with the restrictive covenants that barred the sale of homes to non-whites and discriminatory public and private lending practice, white Detroiters perpetuated widespread harassment, violence and property destruction against blacks who dared move out of the crowded ghetto in the city’s Lower East Side. “For most of the 20th century, Detroit was one of the most segregated cities in the United States,” says Tom Sugrue, a professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of “The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit.” “The city became a magnet for black migrants — and whites fiercely defended their turf against black newcomers.”
One developer even erected a 6-foot-high cement wall between white and black neighborhoods to make the former actuarially sound.
“In many neighborhoods, whites used violence and intimidation to deter black newcomers. In my book, I document nearly 250 incidents involving mobs, vandalism and violence directed toward the first black families to move into formerly white neighborhoods. Whites also formed hundreds of ‘neighborhood improvement associations’ that pledged to keep ‘undesirables’ — namely blacks — out. Real estate brokers and mortgage lenders — backed by federal housing policy — also played a critical role in creating an unfree housing market for African-Americans.”
With the relocation and decline of industry, blacks were stuck in an increasingly jobless and expanding ghetto. Black unemployment rose to 22.5 percent in 1980, doubling in just 20 years. White workers, writes Sugrue, followed industry to the suburbs. Those too poor to stay behind became “angrier and more defensive.” In 1972, every majority white ward in the city supported George Wallace in the Democratic presidential primary. The Alabama governor — who once declared “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever” — had a message that resonated.
The new census numbers show large numbers of blacks moving to the suburbs, and increasing integration as a result: Detroit’s dissimilarity index fell a dramatic 10 points since 2000, one of the largest decreases nationwide. This good news, however, is only made possible by the broader economic disaster.
“Blacks are fleeing the city and are following the path of least resistance into formerly all-white bastions like Warren and Harper Woods, where houses are often on the market for months or years,” says Sugrue. “But many whites, trapped by the collapsing housing market, are unable to move. Hence a decline in segregation rates.” (via Salon)

Today, Detroit is the 4th most segregated city in America.

ardora:

Black children standing in front of half mile concrete wall, Detroit, Michigan. This wall was built in August 1941, to separate the Black section from a white housing development going up on the other side.

Photo by John Vachon


Brief Detroit history to go with this photograph:

In the early 20th century… the city’s real estate was valuable, and jealously guarded by whites. The hundreds of thousands of blacks who migrated to work in the city’s booming auto and defense industries found that most jobs and neighborhoods were closed to them.

In the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s, working-class white ethnics bought homes and began to identify as just “white.” And being white meant keeping blacks, suffering from an extreme housing shortage, away from white neighborhoods and jobs. Along with the restrictive covenants that barred the sale of homes to non-whites and discriminatory public and private lending practice, white Detroiters perpetuated widespread harassment, violence and property destruction against blacks who dared move out of the crowded ghetto in the city’s Lower East Side. “For most of the 20th century, Detroit was one of the most segregated cities in the United States,” says Tom Sugrue, a professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of “The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit.” “The city became a magnet for black migrants — and whites fiercely defended their turf against black newcomers.”

One developer even erected a 6-foot-high cement wall between white and black neighborhoods to make the former actuarially sound.

“In many neighborhoods, whites used violence and intimidation to deter black newcomers. In my book, I document nearly 250 incidents involving mobs, vandalism and violence directed toward the first black families to move into formerly white neighborhoods. Whites also formed hundreds of ‘neighborhood improvement associations’ that pledged to keep ‘undesirables’ — namely blacks — out. Real estate brokers and mortgage lenders — backed by federal housing policy — also played a critical role in creating an unfree housing market for African-Americans.”

With the relocation and decline of industry, blacks were stuck in an increasingly jobless and expanding ghetto. Black unemployment rose to 22.5 percent in 1980, doubling in just 20 years. White workers, writes Sugrue, followed industry to the suburbs. Those too poor to stay behind became “angrier and more defensive.” In 1972, every majority white ward in the city supported George Wallace in the Democratic presidential primary. The Alabama governor — who once declared “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever” — had a message that resonated.

The new census numbers show large numbers of blacks moving to the suburbs, and increasing integration as a result: Detroit’s dissimilarity index fell a dramatic 10 points since 2000, one of the largest decreases nationwide. This good news, however, is only made possible by the broader economic disaster.

“Blacks are fleeing the city and are following the path of least resistance into formerly all-white bastions like Warren and Harper Woods, where houses are often on the market for months or years,” says Sugrue. “But many whites, trapped by the collapsing housing market, are unable to move. Hence a decline in segregation rates.” (via Salon)

Today, Detroit is the 4th most segregated city in America.

Link

socialismartnature:

image

MORE THAN two years have passed since Detroit police murdered 7-year-old Aiyana Stanley Jones.

She was asleep on a sofa in her grandmother’s living room when she was shot to death by officers of the Detroit Police Department (DPD), as a reality TV crew filmed the tragic incident. Today, the Jones family has still not seen justice and continues to be brutalized by the DPD.

Detroit police raided the Jones family’s duplex around midnight on May 16, 2010. Police believed a suspect in a murder that happened a few days earlier was hiding in the home. Rather than wait for the suspect to leave the house, as police officers have since told the media is standard protocol, the cops chose to storm the house in a nighttime raid—bringing camera crews with them—despite the children’s toys scattered across the lawn.

Cops approached the home and threw a flash grenade into the living room through a first floor window, temporarily blinding the occupants inside. According to attorneys for the Jones family, video evidence shows that at that point, Officer Joseph Weekley, a regular guest on reality television, shot inside the home, killing Aiyana. The film has still not been released to the public.

The cops’ version of events has been inconsistent. First, they claimed that Weekley’s gun went off when Aiyana’s grandmother, Mertilla Jones, tried to grab it in a scuffle with Weekley. But Mertilla was arrested, drug tested and examined that night for gunpowder residue on her hands. All of the tests came back negative.

The police have since backed off that story, and now claim that Mertilla brushed against Weekly as she ran from the room, causing his gun to misfire. But there was “no contact with any cop,” Mertilla told reporters. “None. They’re lying.”

 … IMMEDIATELY AFTER the incident, the media set out to cover for the police and blame the Jones family for the tragedy. The day after Aiyana’s murder, Rochelle Riley, a columnist for the Detroit Free Press, wrote that Detroiters “need to stop harboring criminals and averting our eyes to thuggery.”

The Free Press ran a profile of Officer Weekley the next day, saying that he “helmed several charitable endeavors…including one that raises money for children of domestic violence victims.” The profile neglected to mention that a group of Detroit cops, including Weekley, were under federal investigation for a 2007 incident in which police raided a home, shot two dogs to death and pointed guns at children, including infants.

Weekley was arraigned in October 2011, 17 months after the fatal raid, and charged with involuntary manslaughter. He faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. The family is still waiting for the trial, which begins in late October.

Meanwhile, Charles Jones, Aiyana’s father, has been accused of aiding in the murder that police were investigating. He has been charged with first-degree murder, which carries a mandatory minimum sentence of life in prison.

Detroit’s millionaire Democratic Mayor Dave Bing released a statement following Weekley’s arraignment, saying that the city “must use this difficult moment to continue bringing our community and police department together.” But the Jones family has seen what it looks like when the police come together with—or rather, against—the community: terrorism.

In spite of the court system’s foot-dragging, the Joneses have not given up hope for justice. In April 2012, Mertilla Jones made a statement to the press, saying, “I know it’s people out there praying for us…While they’re reaching out, I’m going to grab a hold of their hand. It’s time for us to stand up and speak out for Aiyana.”

(via erinripley-deactivated20131113)

Tags: Aiyana Detroit
Link

socialismartnature:

image

MORE THAN two years have passed since Detroit police murdered 7-year-old Aiyana Stanley Jones.

She was asleep on a sofa in her grandmother’s living room when she was shot to death by officers of the Detroit Police Department (DPD), as a reality TV crew filmed the tragic incident. Today, the Jones family has still not seen justice and continues to be brutalized by the DPD.

Detroit police raided the Jones family’s duplex around midnight on May 16, 2010. Police believed a suspect in a murder that happened a few days earlier was hiding in the home. Rather than wait for the suspect to leave the house, as police officers have since told the media is standard protocol, the cops chose to storm the house in a nighttime raid—bringing camera crews with them—despite the children’s toys scattered across the lawn.

Cops approached the home and threw a flash grenade into the living room through a first floor window, temporarily blinding the occupants inside. According to attorneys for the Jones family, video evidence shows that at that point, Officer Joseph Weekley, a regular guest on reality television, shot inside the home, killing Aiyana. The film has still not been released to the public.

The cops’ version of events has been inconsistent. First, they claimed that Weekley’s gun went off when Aiyana’s grandmother, Mertilla Jones, tried to grab it in a scuffle with Weekley. But Mertilla was arrested, drug tested and examined that night for gunpowder residue on her hands. All of the tests came back negative.

The police have since backed off that story, and now claim that Mertilla brushed against Weekly as she ran from the room, causing his gun to misfire. But there was “no contact with any cop,” Mertilla told reporters. “None. They’re lying.”

 … IMMEDIATELY AFTER the incident, the media set out to cover for the police and blame the Jones family for the tragedy. The day after Aiyana’s murder, Rochelle Riley, a columnist for the Detroit Free Press, wrote that Detroiters “need to stop harboring criminals and averting our eyes to thuggery.”

The Free Press ran a profile of Officer Weekley the next day, saying that he “helmed several charitable endeavors…including one that raises money for children of domestic violence victims.” The profile neglected to mention that a group of Detroit cops, including Weekley, were under federal investigation for a 2007 incident in which police raided a home, shot two dogs to death and pointed guns at children, including infants.

Weekley was arraigned in October 2011, 17 months after the fatal raid, and charged with involuntary manslaughter. He faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. The family is still waiting for the trial, which begins in late October.

Meanwhile, Charles Jones, Aiyana’s father, has been accused of aiding in the murder that police were investigating. He has been charged with first-degree murder, which carries a mandatory minimum sentence of life in prison.

Detroit’s millionaire Democratic Mayor Dave Bing released a statement following Weekley’s arraignment, saying that the city “must use this difficult moment to continue bringing our community and police department together.” But the Jones family has seen what it looks like when the police come together with—or rather, against—the community: terrorism.

In spite of the court system’s foot-dragging, the Joneses have not given up hope for justice. In April 2012, Mertilla Jones made a statement to the press, saying, “I know it’s people out there praying for us…While they’re reaching out, I’m going to grab a hold of their hand. It’s time for us to stand up and speak out for Aiyana.”

(via erinripley-deactivated20131113)

Tags: Aiyana Detroit
Audio

soulofmotown:

Marvin Gaye - “Heard It Through the Grapevine” - In the Groove [1968]

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