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negrosakidojo:

Malcolm X Deleted Scene on Pork

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notime4yourshit:

You can mistake me for Italian or Latino…but even when you look like me, they won’t let you (a Black) have the role. They let you know in no uncertain terms you can’t have the job because you’re Black. - Lonette McKee

 i love her! i love her voice when she talks.. it’s a little raspy. she’s one of my favorite actresses.

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Malcolm X: Front Page Challenge, January 5, 1965

  • White Interviewer #1: Sometimes, whether you may have or not, and I think probably you have, have sometimes, seems to me, been preaching hate to meet hate.
  • Malcolm X: I don't advocate any kind of hate, but I think that-
  • White Interviewer #1: But there's a lot of talk that sounds very much like it.
  • Malcolm X: No, I think that the guilt complex of the American white man is so profound, until when you begin to analyze the real condition of the Black man in America, instead of the American white man eliminating the causes that create that condition, he tries to cover it up by accusing his accusers of teaching hate, but actually they're just exposing him for being responsible for what exists.
  • White Interviewer #1: Well, that's something of an argument, but I've heard speeches made by some of the people of your group. I think I've heard you make speeches. It seems to me that you are advocating violence to meet the serious injuries that have been done to your people with which I totally agree.
  • Malcolm X: I don't call that violence. I don't in any way encourage Black people to go out and initiate acts of aggression indiscriminately against whites. But I do believe that the Black man in the United states, and any human being anywhere, is well within his right to do whatever is necessary, by any means necessary, to protect his life and property, especially in a country where the federal government itself has proven that it is either unable or unwilling to protect the lives and property of those human beings.
  • White Interviewer #2: Are you still a Muslim?
  • Malcolm X: Oh, yes. I'm a Muslim. I believe in the religion of Islam which believes in brotherhood; complete brotherhood of all people. But at the same time that I believe in this brotherhood, I don't believe enforcing my desire for brotherhood upon those who aren't willing to accept it.
  • White Interviewer #2: The Christians would say that they also believe in brotherhood. What would you say to that?
  • Malcolm X: I'd say they believe in it but don't practice it.
  • White Interviewer #3: Mr. X, since your split with the Black Muslim movement, have you formed your own group?
  • Malcolm X: Yes.
  • White Interviewer #3: And also, you say that you don't believe that Martin Luther King has solutions. What are your solutions?
  • Malcolm X: Well, first we formed two groups. The split resulted in the formation of two groups. Those who left the Black Muslim movement regrouped into what has now become known as the Muslim Mosque Incorporated, which is strictly religious; based upon the religion as it is taught in Mecca and Cairo, and other centers of Islamic religious learning. Then, realizing that our problem in America, that we are Black Americans; we have a problem that goes beyond religion. We formed the group known as the Organization of Afro-American Unity, and the objective of this organization-It's nonreligious, number one. Any negro can belong to it. And the objective of that organization is to bring about a condition that will guarantee respect and recognition of the 22 million Black Americans as human beings. And-
  • White Interviewer #3: Now, this is very radical, but how?
  • Malcolm X: By any means necessary. We feel that the problem, number one, of the Black man in America, is beyond America's ability to solve. It's a human problem, not an American problem or a Negro problem. And as a human problem, or a world problem, we feel that it should be taken out of the jurisdiction of the United States government and the United States courts, and taken into the United Nations in the same manner that the problems of the Black man in South Africa, Angola, and other parts of the world, and even the way they're trying to bring the problems of the Jews in Russia into the United Nations because of violation of human rights. We believe that our problem is one not of violation of civil rights, but a violation of human rights. Not only are we denied the right to be a citizen in the United States, we're denied the right to be a human being.
  • Interviewers: .......
Quote
"The civil rights bill was passed only because it cannot be enforced. It’s like the government writing a check to be cashed at a bank in Peking and then stamping” Not for travel in China” on your passport. It is my view the civil rights bill was passed to misguide the states of Africa into accepting an angelic image of [America]."

Malcolm X

Taken from February 1965: The Final Speeches (page 46).

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

True. True. True. True. And TRUE. And people call X just “an agitator”… yet, nearly 50 years later, I dare someone to dispute this!

I’m anxiously waiting with my facts over here….  

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Malcolm X Interview February 4, 1965

  • Question: Are you in agreement with Dr. King's nonviolent-
  • Malcolm X: I don't believe in any kind of nonviolence. I believe that it is right to be nonviolent with people who are nonviolent. But when you're dealing with an enemy that doesn't know what nonviolence is, as far as I'm concerned you're wasting your time.
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"The Western press is the strongest weapon of imperialism."

Fron an article where Malcolm X was interviewed. Taken from February 1965: The Final Speeches (Page 33). We all have to be aware that the West uses the press to make the criminal the victim and the victim the criminal.

An example of how this was used was in the Congo in Africa. The imperialist agent Thsombe murdered Patrice Lumumba while the press lied to boost Thsombe’s image at the expense of Lumumba who was the rightful leader. If we’re not careful with the press, we’ll end up loving our enemies and hating our friends. It’s the same pattern against all the dark skinned people all over the world.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

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knowledgeequalsblackpower:


Butterfly McQueen achieved fame primarily as a film actress in the 1940s…She was born Thelma McQueen on January 8, 1911, in Tampa, Florida, the only child of a stevedore (waterfront-related, like the loading/unloading ships) and a cleaning woman. 

She attended grammar school and cultivated her interests in music and dance. From, the Negro Youth Project to the Federal Theater Project, McQueen was able to play in many productions. Her performance in the musical “Swingin’ in Dream” brought her to the attention of David O. Selznick, producer of “Gone with the Wind.”
McQueen got great reviews for her role as Prissy, however, in retrospect, many African-Americans regretted her performance.

Malcolm X, for example, recalled feeling both anger and shame the first time he saw Prissy on screen.

However, to be fair to McQueen, she herself thought Prissy backward. She also resisted many offensive characterizations. She refused to eat watermelon in one scene and only after she made sure everyone was aware of her displeasure did she submit to the scene where Scarlett O’Hare (played by Vivien Leigh) to slap her after she speaks the immortal line

Lawdy, Miz Scarlett, I don’t know nuthin’ ‘bout birthin’ babies!

All of her subsequent roles, for the most part, were a variation of Prissy. McQueen had to “act stereotypes or starve.” 

To protest the lines she was asked to speak as a colored servant on Jack Benny’s radio program, she walked out of the studio, and when she declined similar motion picture assignments, casting agents boycotted her for more than a year. The actress retired from films in 1947. “I didn’t mind playing a maid the first time, because I thought that was how you got into the business… but after I did the same thing over and over I resented it. I didn’t mind being funny, but I didn’t like being stupid.”

She briefly returned to Hollywood in the 50s, but left again. For the next the 50 years, she did menial jobs. In 1975, at age 64, she earned a Bachelor of Arts major in Spanish and immersed herself in social welfare projects.
She occasionally still acts (as she did in “The Mosquito Net” starring Harrison Ford), however, for her stand against racist stereotyping, she was, in effect, punished by the Hollywood establishment and her acting career never recovered.
(via Black Women in America Encyclopedia)

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Butterfly McQueen achieved fame primarily as a film actress in the 1940s…She was born Thelma McQueen on January 8, 1911, in Tampa, Florida, the only child of a stevedore (waterfront-related, like the loading/unloading ships) and a cleaning woman. 

She attended grammar school and cultivated her interests in music and dance. From, the Negro Youth Project to the Federal Theater Project, McQueen was able to play in many productions. Her performance in the musical “Swingin’ in Dream” brought her to the attention of David O. Selznick, producer of “Gone with the Wind.”

McQueen got great reviews for her role as Prissy, however, in retrospect, many African-Americans regretted her performance.

Malcolm X, for example, recalled feeling both anger and shame the first time he saw Prissy on screen.

However, to be fair to McQueen, she herself thought Prissy backward. She also resisted many offensive characterizations. She refused to eat watermelon in one scene and only after she made sure everyone was aware of her displeasure did she submit to the scene where Scarlett O’Hare (played by Vivien Leigh) to slap her after she speaks the immortal line

Lawdy, Miz Scarlett, I don’t know nuthin’ ‘bout birthin’ babies!

All of her subsequent roles, for the most part, were a variation of Prissy. McQueen had to “act stereotypes or starve.” 

To protest the lines she was asked to speak as a colored servant on Jack Benny’s radio program, she walked out of the studio, and when she declined similar motion picture assignments, casting agents boycotted her for more than a year. The actress retired from films in 1947. I didn’t mind playing a maid the first time, because I thought that was how you got into the business… but after I did the same thing over and over I resented it. I didn’t mind being funny, but I didn’t like being stupid.”

She briefly returned to Hollywood in the 50s, but left again. For the next the 50 years, she did menial jobs. In 1975, at age 64, she earned a Bachelor of Arts major in Spanish and immersed herself in social welfare projects.

She occasionally still acts (as she did in “The Mosquito Net” starring Harrison Ford), however, for her stand against racist stereotyping, she was, in effect, punished by the Hollywood establishment and her acting career never recovered.

(via Black Women in America Encyclopedia)

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