Photo
n-a-s-a:

Pandora’s Cluster — Hubble view of Abell 2744 
Credit: NASA, ESA and D. Coe (STScI)/J. Merten (Heidelberg/Bologna) 

n-a-s-a:

Pandora’s Cluster — Hubble view of Abell 2744 

Credit: NASA, ESA and D. Coe (STScI)/J. Merten (Heidelberg/Bologna) 

(via fuckyeah-stars)

Tags: astronomy
Quote
"When I’m asked about the relevance to Black people of what I do, I take that as an affront. It presupposes that Black people have never been involved in exploring the heavens, but this is not so. Ancient African empires — Mali, Songhai, Egypt — had scientists, astronomers. The fact is that space and its resources belong to all of us, not to any one group."

— Dr. Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman in space.

Photo
fyeah-history:

Portrait of Nicholaus Copernicus, 1580Nicolaus Copernicus (19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance mathematician and astronomer who formulated a comprehensive heliocentric model which placed the Sun, rather than the Earth, at the center of the universe. The publication of Copernicus’ epochal book, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres), just before his death in 1543, is considered a major event in the history of science. It began the Copernican Revolution and contributed importantly to the rise of the ensuing Scientific Revolution. Copernicus’ heliocentric theory placed the Sun at the center of the solar system and described that system’s mechanics in mathematical rather than Aristotelian terms.

What mainstream White history will not tell you is that Copernicus got his ideas from Muslim astronomers Nasir al-Din al-Tusi, Ibn al-Shatir (and others) who wrote years earlier.
Why don’t we ever learn about them? Why is it that Copernicus is seen as the beginning of an idea instead of someone who is at the end of it (which is what he was)?
8 minute video clip from BBC documentary “Science and Islam” 
Muslim Achievements in Science and Technology
It’s like giving someone who comes in last place the first place trophy.

fyeah-history:

Portrait of Nicholaus Copernicus, 1580
Nicolaus Copernicus (19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance mathematician and astronomer who formulated a comprehensive heliocentric model which placed the Sun, rather than the Earth, at the center of the universe. The publication of Copernicus’ epochal book, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres), just before his death in 1543, is considered a major event in the history of science. It began the Copernican Revolution and contributed importantly to the rise of the ensuing Scientific Revolution. Copernicus’ heliocentric theory placed the Sun at the center of the solar system and described that system’s mechanics in mathematical rather than Aristotelian terms.

What mainstream White history will not tell you is that Copernicus got his ideas from Muslim astronomers Nasir al-Din al-Tusi, Ibn al-Shatir (and others) who wrote years earlier.

Why don’t we ever learn about them? Why is it that Copernicus is seen as the beginning of an idea instead of someone who is at the end of it (which is what he was)?

8 minute video clip from BBC documentary “Science and Islam”

Muslim Achievements in Science and Technology

It’s like giving someone who comes in last place the first place trophy.

Photoset

Dr. Mae C. Jemison

Stephanie Wilson

Joan Higginbotham

Dr. Yvonne Cagle

As we admire these women this month, we must also remember how difficult of a journey they must have had. And we must make a commitment to make the journey easier for little Black girls who are interested in science.

In her book Swimming Against the Tide: African American Girls and Science Education, Sandra Hanson explodes the myth that black girls are somehow disinterested in science due to hyper-religiosity or “culture.”   Hanson found that, despite significant institutional and societal barriers, there is greater interest in science among African American girls than in other student populations. She frames this seeming paradox in historical context, stressing that “Early ideologies about natural inequalities by race influenced the work of scientists and scholars as well as the treatment of minorities in the science domain.  Racism is a key feature of science in the United States and elsewhere.  This has a large impact on the potential for success among minority students.  Early work on science as fair has not been supported.”

Hanson outlines some of the obstacles that confront budding African American women scientists from elementary school to the postgraduate level.  Stereotypes about girls of color lacking proficiency in science, the absence of nurturing mentors, the dearth of education about people of color who have contributed to science research (i.e., culturally responsive science instruction), and academic isolation often deter youth who would like to pursue science careers.


Conservatives who disdain “liberal multiculturalism” in higher education dismiss such concerns about diversity in hiring as handwringing.  According to this view there is only one standard academia should use; objective and unbiased, untainted by affirmative action.

Yet white students are beneficiaries of cradle to grave affirmative action.  White students grow up seeing the dominant image of rational, trailblazing scientific discovery (from films like Dr. Strangelove to 2001: A Space Odyssey to Close Encounters to The Right Stuff) as spearheaded by courageous rugged individualist generally white males.  They are socialized to believe in a template of “purely” meritocratic success and individual achievement. Meritocracy becomes gospel and lucre.  They can take it to the bank and use it to repel the less qualified savages.

While she was at UCLA Devin Waller was the only African American woman in the Astrophysics department. On the first day of her upper division classes she recalls being asked by male students befuddled by her presence whether or not they “were in the right class.” Since peer networking and study groups in science departments are largely white and male, white academic success and scholarly legitimacy in science become a self-fulfilling prophecy. For black women in white male dominated professions, showing vulnerability and having any kind of public failure are simply not options. Like many women of color Devin’s approach was that “You kind of go in there and set a precedent. Everything you do is watched. You have to establish yourself as intelligent. There were no black women in my classes. No one who looked like me.”

Not having anyone who looks like them as a faculty member, administrator and/or mentor influences the sense of isolation, anxiety, and burnout that students of color often experience in science disciplines.  As an Electrical Engineering major Kimberly Bryant, founder of Black Girls Code, a nonprofit dedicated to developing African American girls as computer programmers, also found herself “feeling culturally isolated” during college.  On her website she argues that  the “dearth of African-American women in science, technology, engineering and math professions…cannot be explained by, say, a lack of interest in these fields. Lack of access and lack of exposure to STEM topics are the likelier culprits.”

In her autobiography Find Where the Wind Goes: Moments from My Life, Mae Carol Jemison (the first black woman astronaut and first woman of color in space) reflects on how, after professing interest in being a scientist to one of her teachers, she was told to set her sights on being a nurse instead.  As a sixteen year-old undergraduate at Stanford University, Jemison was practically shunned by her physical science instructors.  Although her experiences occurred during the sixties and seventies, the dominant view of who is a proper scientist has not changed and nursing is still a more acceptable aspiration for black women who are culturally expected to be self-sacrificing caregivers for everyone in the universe.

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Photo
afroxander:thenoobyorker:

 APOD: Orion over El Castillo 
Image Credit & Copyright: Stéphane Guisard (Los Cielos de America, TWAN) Credits: D. Flores and B. Pichardo (Inst. Astronomia UNAM), P. Sánchez and R. Nafate (INAH)
Explanation:  Welcome to the December solstice, a day the world does not end … even according to the Mayan Calendar. To celebrate, consider this dramatic picture of Orion rising over El Castillo, the central pyramid at Chichén Itzá, one of the great Mayan centers on the Yucatán peninsula. Also known as the Temple of Kukulkan it stands 30 meters tall and 55 meters wide at the base. Built up as a series of square terraces by the pre-Columbian civilization between the 9th and 12th century, the structure can be used as a calendar and is noted for astronomical alignments. In fact, the Mayans were accomplished astronomers and mathematicians, accurately using the cyclic motions of the stars, Sun, Moon, and planets to measure time and construct calendars. Peering through clouds in this night skyscape, stars in the modern constellation Orion the Hunter represented a turtle in the Mayan sky. Tak sáamal.

afroxander:thenoobyorker:

APOD: Orion over El Castillo

Image Credit & Copyright: Stéphane Guisard (Los Cielos de America, TWAN)
Credits: D. Flores and B. Pichardo (Inst. Astronomia UNAM), P. Sánchez and R. Nafate (INAH)

Explanation: Welcome to the December solstice, a day the world does not end … even according to the Mayan Calendar. To celebrate, consider this dramatic picture of Orion rising over El Castillo, the central pyramid at Chichén Itzá, one of the great Mayan centers on the Yucatán peninsula. Also known as the Temple of Kukulkan it stands 30 meters tall and 55 meters wide at the base. Built up as a series of square terraces by the pre-Columbian civilization between the 9th and 12th century, the structure can be used as a calendar and is noted for astronomical alignments. In fact, the Mayans were accomplished astronomers and mathematicians, accurately using the cyclic motions of the stars, Sun, Moon, and planets to measure time and construct calendars. Peering through clouds in this night skyscape, stars in the modern constellation Orion the Hunter represented a turtle in the Mayan sky. Tak sáamal.

(via revolutionary-afrolatino)

Photoset

sciencesoup:

Astrophotography by Jason Jennings

When being a person gets stressful, as it tends to do, I sometimes take time out to just appreciate this strange and bewitching universe. I fill my head with thoughts of the stellar winds of a thousand newborn stars; of images we’ve captured of ancient galaxies nearly as old as the universe itself; of distant worlds with triple-sunned-skies; of comets in the Oort Cloud plunging around the sun like a cloud of electrons around the burning heart of our atomic solar system… And I have to remind myself that these places actually exist in the same world as exams and crippling anxiety and politics and terrorism and poverty. But I don’t wonder at the universe’s vastness to make myself feel small or make my problems seem less significant—instead, I take comfort in the fact that I’m directly connected to the stars, and that no matter what happens, I’ll always belong to the universe as a little part of an immense cosmic ecosystem.

Photo
ikenbot:

Stars of Mount Fuji
Winter constellations from Taurus (right) to Orion (center) and Canis Major (left) with the dazzling star Sirius line above the symmetrical cone of Mount Fuji, the world-known natural symbol of Japan. The volcano, that last erupted about 300 years ago, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776m and one of the country’s “Three Holy Mountains”. Mt. Fuji is just west of Tokyo and near the Pacific coast. This winter night image is taken from Yamanakako village of Yamanashi prefecture. — Shingo Takei

ikenbot:

Stars of Mount Fuji

Winter constellations from Taurus (right) to Orion (center) and Canis Major (left) with the dazzling star Sirius line above the symmetrical cone of Mount Fuji, the world-known natural symbol of Japan. The volcano, that last erupted about 300 years ago, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776m and one of the country’s “Three Holy Mountains”. Mt. Fuji is just west of Tokyo and near the Pacific coast. This winter night image is taken from Yamanakako village of Yamanashi prefecture.Shingo Takei

(Source: afro-dominicano)

Video

thescienceofreality:

“To observe how winds move high in Earth’s atmosphere, scientists sometimes release clouds of barium as tracers to track how the material corkscrews and sweeps around – but scientists have no similar technique to study the turbulent atmosphere of the Sun. So researchers were excited in December 2011, when Comet Lovejoy swept right through the sun’s corona with its long tail streaming behind it. 

I captured images of the comet, showing how its long tail was buffeted by systems around the Sun, offering scientists a unique way of observing movement as if they’d orchestrated the experiment themselves. Since comet tails have ionized gases, they are also affected by the Sun’s magnetic field, and can act as tracers of the complex magnetic system higher up in the atmosphere. Comets can also aid in the study of coronal mass ejections and the solar wind.”
Photo
ikenbot:

Earth at Night
This new global view of Earth’s city lights is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite.
Credit: NASA’s Earth Observatory/NOAA/DOD
The data was acquired over nine days in April 2012 and 13 days in October 2012. It took 312 orbits to get a clear shot of every parcel of Earth’s land surface and islands. This new data was then mapped over existing Blue Marble imagery of Earth to provide a realistic view of the planet.
The image was made possible by the satellite’s “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires and reflected moonlight.
The day-night band observed Hurricane Sandy, illuminated by moonlight, making landfall over New Jersey on the evening of Oct. 29. Night images showed the widespread power outages that left millions in darkness in the wake of the storm.

ikenbot:

Earth at Night

This new global view of Earth’s city lights is a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite.

Credit: NASA’s Earth Observatory/NOAA/DOD

The data was acquired over nine days in April 2012 and 13 days in October 2012. It took 312 orbits to get a clear shot of every parcel of Earth’s land surface and islands. This new data was then mapped over existing Blue Marble imagery of Earth to provide a realistic view of the planet.

The image was made possible by the satellite’s “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires and reflected moonlight.

The day-night band observed Hurricane Sandy, illuminated by moonlight, making landfall over New Jersey on the evening of Oct. 29. Night images showed the widespread power outages that left millions in darkness in the wake of the storm.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

Quote
"

There may be a hundred billion planetary systems in the galaxy awaiting exploration. Not one of those worlds will be identical to Earth. A few will be hospitable; most will appear hostile. Many will be achingly beautiful. In some wolds there will be many suns in the daytime sky, many moons in the heavens at night, or great particle ring systems soaring from horizon to horizon. Some moons will be so close that their planet will loom high in the heavens, covering half the sky. And some worlds will look out into a vast gaseous nebula, all those skies, rich in distant and exotic constellations, there will be a faint yellow star — perhaps barely seen by the naked eye, perhaps visible only through the telescope — the home star of the fleet of interstellar transports exploring this tiny region of the Milky Way Galaxy.

The themes of space and time are, we have seen, intertwined. Worlds and stars, like people, are born, live and die. The lifetime of a human being measured in decades; the lifetime of the Sun is a hundred million times longer. Compared to a star, we are like mayflies, fleeting ephemeral creatures who live out their whole lives in the course of a single day. From the point of view of a mayfly, human beings are stolid, boring, almost entirely immovable, offering hardly a hint that they ever do anything. From the point of view of a star, a human being is a tiny flash, one of the billions of brief lives flickering tenuously on the surface of a strangely cold, anomalously solid, exotically remote sphere of silicate and iron.

In all these other worlds in space there are events in progress, occurrences that will determine their futures. And on our small planet, this moment in history is a historical branch point as profound as the confrontation of the Ionian scientists with the mystics 2,500 years ago. What we do with our world in this time will propagate down though the centuries and powerfully determine the destiny of our descendants and their fate, if any, among the stars.

"

— Carl Sagan — Travels in Space and TimeCosmos (via ikenbot)

(Source: afro-dominicano)

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