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melanatedcontributions:

The Last TasmanianTasmanian, any member of the extinct Australoid population of Tasmania. The Tasmanians were an isolate population of Aboriginal Australians, not a separate or distinctive population, who were cut off from the mainland when a general rise in the sea level flooded the Bass Strait about 10,000 years ago. Their population upon the arrival of European explorers in the 17th and 18th centuries has been estimated at about 4,000. They were a relatively short people, with generally Australoid physical characteristics. The Tasmanians spoke languages that were unintelligible to mainland Aborigines.The island was divided among several tribes speaking different dialects, each with a delimited hunting territory. Subsistence was based on hunting land and sea mammals and collecting shellfish and vegetable food. In warm months the Tasmanians moved through the open forest and moorlands of the interior in bands or family groups of 15 to 50 people; in colder months they moved to the coast. Occasionally, bands gathered together for a corroboree (a dance celebrating important events), a hunt, or for protection against attack.Wooden spears, waddies (clubs, or throwing sticks), and flaked-stone tools and weapons were produced. Bone implements, basketry, and bark canoes for coastal travel were also made. A few rock carvings depicting natural objects and conventionalized symbols have survived.The first permanent white settlement was made in Tasmania in 1803; in 1804 an unprovoked attack by whites on a group of Tasmanians was the first episode in the Black War. The whites treated the Aborigines as subhumans, seizing their hunting grounds, depleting their food supply, attacking the women, and killing the men. Tasmanian attempts to resist were met with the superior weaponry and force of the Europeans. Between 1831 and 1835, in a final effort at conciliation and to prevent the extermination of the approximately 200 remaining Tasmanians, the Aborigines were removed to Flinders Island. Their social organization and traditional way of life destroyed, subjected to alien disease and attempts to “civilize” them, they soon died. Truganini (d. 1876), a Tasmanian woman who aided the resettlement on Flinders Island, was the last full-blooded Aborigine in Tasmania. Another Tasmanian woman is said to have survived on Kangaroo Island in South Australia until 1888.

melanatedcontributions:

The Last Tasmanian

Tasmanian, any member of the extinct Australoid population of Tasmania. The Tasmanians were an isolate population of Aboriginal Australians, not a separate or distinctive population, who were cut off from the mainland when a general rise in the sea level flooded the Bass Strait about 10,000 years ago. Their population upon the arrival of European explorers in the 17th and 18th centuries has been estimated at about 4,000. They were a relatively short people, with generally Australoid physical characteristics. The Tasmanians spoke languages that were unintelligible to mainland Aborigines.

The island was divided among several tribes speaking different dialects, each with a delimited hunting territory. Subsistence was based on hunting land and sea mammals and collecting shellfish and vegetable food. In warm months the Tasmanians moved through the open forest and moorlands of the interior in bands or family groups of 15 to 50 people; in colder months they moved to the coast. Occasionally, bands gathered together for a corroboree (a dance celebrating important events), a hunt, or for protection against attack.

Wooden spears, waddies (clubs, or throwing sticks), and flaked-stone tools and weapons were produced. Bone implements, basketry, and bark canoes for coastal travel were also made. A few rock carvings depicting natural objects and conventionalized symbols have survived.

The first permanent white settlement was made in Tasmania in 1803; in 1804 an unprovoked attack by whites on a group of Tasmanians was the first episode in the Black War. The whites treated the Aborigines as subhumans, seizing their hunting grounds, depleting their food supply, attacking the women, and killing the men. Tasmanian attempts to resist were met with the superior weaponry and force of the Europeans. Between 1831 and 1835, in a final effort at conciliation and to prevent the extermination of the approximately 200 remaining Tasmanians, the Aborigines were removed to Flinders Island. Their social organization and traditional way of life destroyed, subjected to alien disease and attempts to “civilize” them, they soon died. Truganini (d. 1876), a Tasmanian woman who aided the resettlement on Flinders Island, was the last full-blooded Aborigine in Tasmania. Another Tasmanian woman is said to have survived on Kangaroo Island in South Australia until 1888.

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thewhitemankilledthetruth:

I’ve been coming back to this story a couple times since it’s been published and it’s still super fascinating to me.

there is the aspect of this dude most likely deceiving the indigenous community and altering the eco-system of their waters (because evil white folks)

but then there’s the fact that his insane geoengineering project is actually working and I think that has interesting implications.

(Source: youngbadmangone)

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cowgirlcravings:

Indian Pow Wow at Chambers Farm, Fort McCoy Fl, Nov 2012. #powwow #fl (at Chambers Farm Pow Wow)

cowgirlcravings:

Indian Pow Wow at Chambers Farm, Fort McCoy Fl, Nov 2012. #powwow #fl (at Chambers Farm Pow Wow)

(via snowyowlwhitecotton-deactivated)

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kapwacollective:


Indigenous Is Indigenous is not a skin color, Indigenous is not my nose, Indigenous is not my eye color, Indigenous is not my lips,
Indigenous is not romanticizing ancient teachings, To appropriate, To disseminate, To cut to pieces, And abbreviate in a research document, Indigenous is removing layers of shame from your ancestors trail, Indigenous is stepping up to the plate, Healing and creating a new way for future generations, Indigenous is standing tall, Indigenous is standing beautifully, Indigenous is an honor.
 ~ Anishinaabekwe Painting © Ernesto Hernandez Olmos, Mother Earth

kapwacollective:

Indigenous Is
Indigenous is not a skin color,
Indigenous is not my nose,
Indigenous is not my eye color,
Indigenous is not my lips,

Indigenous is not romanticizing ancient teachings,
To appropriate,
To disseminate,
To cut to pieces,
And abbreviate in a research document,
Indigenous is removing layers of shame from your ancestors trail,
Indigenous is stepping up to the plate,
Healing and creating a new way for future generations,
Indigenous is standing tall,
Indigenous is standing beautifully,
Indigenous is an honor.

~ Anishinaabekwe
Painting © Ernesto Hernandez Olmos, Mother Earth

(via sinidentidades)

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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:


“American’s greatest mass hanging — the execution of 38 Sioux Indians — was personally ordered by the ‘Great Emancipator,’ President Abraham Lincoln.”
Largest mass hanging in United States history38 Santee “Sioux” Indian menMankato, Minnesota, Dec. 16, 1862
What brought about the hanging of 38 Sioux Indians in Minnesota December 1862 was the failure “again” of the U.S. Government to honor it’s treaties with Indian Nations. Indians were not given the money or food set forth to them for signing a treaty to turn over more than a million acres of their land and be forced to live on a reservation. Indian agents keep the treaty money and food that was to go to the Indians, the food was sold to White settlers, food that was given to the Indians was spoiled and not fit for a dog to eat. Indian hunting parties went off the reservation land looking for food to feed their families, one hunting group took eggs from a White settlers land and the rest is history.
Read more

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

“American’s greatest mass hanging — the execution of 38 Sioux Indians — was personally ordered by the ‘Great Emancipator,’ President Abraham Lincoln.”

Largest mass hanging in United States history
38 Santee “Sioux” Indian men
Mankato, Minnesota, Dec. 16, 1862

What brought about the hanging of 38 Sioux Indians in Minnesota December 1862 was the failure “again” of the U.S. Government to honor it’s treaties with Indian Nations. Indians were not given the money or food set forth to them for signing a treaty to turn over more than a million acres of their land and be forced to live on a reservation. 

Indian agents keep the treaty money and food that was to go to the Indians, the food was sold to White settlers, food that was given to the Indians was spoiled and not fit for a dog to eat. Indian hunting parties went off the reservation land looking for food to feed their families, one hunting group took eggs from a White settlers land and the rest is history.

Read more

(via sinidentidades)

Photo
the-first-nations:


Plenty Horses’ defense after slaying Lt. Casey near Pine Ridge, South Dakota. “Five years I attended Carlisle Indian School and was educated in the ways of the white man. When I returned to my people, I was an outcast among them. I was no longer an Indian. I was not a white man. I was lonely. I shot the lieutenant so I might make a place for myself among my people. I am now one of them. I shall be hung, and the Indians will bury me as a warrior.” He was finally released.

the-first-nations:

Plenty Horses’ defense after slaying Lt. Casey near Pine Ridge, South Dakota. “Five years I attended Carlisle Indian School and was educated in the ways of the white man. When I returned to my people, I was an outcast among them. I was no longer an Indian. I was not a white man. I was lonely. I shot the lieutenant so I might make a place for myself among my people. I am now one of them. I shall be hung, and the Indians will bury me as a warrior.” He was finally released.

(via snowyowlwhitecotton-deactivated)

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wickwareboisseau:

Pretty Nose, Cheyenne
Photo
snowyowlwhitecotton:

“Peru’s natural gas project sparks worry for Amazon’s isolated tribe”

snowyowlwhitecotton:

“Peru’s natural gas project sparks worry for Amazon’s isolated tribe”

(via snowyowlwhitecotton-deactivated)

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snowyowlwhitecotton:

“Elizabeth Bad Roads-Schlall (Umatilla) and her husband, Francis Schlall (Paiute) on their Wedding Day - 1929”

snowyowlwhitecotton:

“Elizabeth Bad Roads-Schlall (Umatilla) and her husband, Francis Schlall (Paiute) on their Wedding Day - 1929”

(via snowyowlwhitecotton-deactivated)

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Knowledge Equals Black Power by knowledgeequalsblackpower.tumblr.com is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.