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Photographs of the Civil Right movement have, for several reasons, been curated down to a handful of familiar images that tell a tidy story: Peaceful, passive African Americans were set upon, harassed, beaten, and jailed by vicious white bigots, an alarming number of them in police uniforms. But history is never that neat, never so simple, as Martin A. Berger reminds us so forcefully in Freedom Now! Forgotten Photographs of the Civil Rights Struggle. The photographs shown here depict African Americans behaving more forcefully, fighting back, organizing, protesting, and doing what they can to wrench the freedom to which they were entitled from the white hands that withheld it. The people shown here are not saints. They are not even always heroes. But we will never know the fullness of their story unless we include these images into the accepted narrative. 

(Source: diasporadash)

Tags: photography
Video

3rdeyechicago:

The Life and Work of historic photographer, Gordon Parks.

Video

collectedinspiration:

Audio transcription:

Carrie Mae Weems discusses her 1995-96 photography series, “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried.”

"Power and sex: they control so much of our lives. I’ve spent a great deal of time looking at questions of race and gender, and out of that came this piece, ‘From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried.’ You have this narrative that runs across the entire work, images that lay out a very specific development of history: of photographic history in the United States and of Black history in the United States.

"They’re all, for the most part, black and white photographs. I used a monochrome red; I placed mattes over the top of them to obscure certain elements; I add text on glass in order to also distance the original photograph and make clear this was something that was taken from something else; this was lifted.

"The thing that I learned to do, that I pay attention to, are patterns of repetition. That simple refrain of ‘you became, you became, you became,’ or simply, ‘ha, ha, ha.’

"So there’s three narratives that are working simultaneously, and then the individual photographs, for the most part, stand alone as individual units. A narrative like ‘you became a scientific profile’; a negroid type’; ‘an anthrophological debate’; ‘a photographic subject’—they’re all of these sort of singular moments that go on to make a more complex story. I suppose, in a way, it’s like a film, the way in which film functions. It doesn’t have a single note, but it has many. It has notes of complication and duplicity and complicity. I love the rhythm of the text that’s created that allows for the image to be amplified."

Photoset

soulbrotherv2:

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video (Frist Center for the Visual Arts)

The work of contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953) hits hard with a powerful mix of lived life and social commentary. Since the late 1970s, her photographs, films, and installations have become known for presenting realistic and authentic images of African Americans while confronting themes of race, gender, and class. This book, the first major survey of Weems’s career, traces the artist’s commitment to addressing issues of social justice through her artwork. Her early photographs, which focused on African American women and families, have since led to work that examines more general aspects of the African diaspora, from the legacy of slavery to the perpetuation of debilitating stereotypes. Increasingly, she has broadened her view to include global struggles for equality and justice.

This beautifully illustrated book highlights over 200 of Weems’s most important works. Accompanying essays by leading scholars explore Weems’s interest in folklore, her focus on the spoken and written word, the performative aspect of her constructed tableaux, and her expressions of black beauty.

Photoset

Brazilian Photographer Gustavo Lacerda’s ‘Albinos’ Series

In Lacerda’s home country of Brazil, albino people mostly live on the Ilha dos Lencois, a sparsely populated island that also functions as an ibis sanctuary, according to Lonely Planet. At one point, the existence of albinism in northern Brazil was extensively studied, but then died down, until the Daily Mail went crazy over a story about an Afro-Brazilian woman who apparently had three children with albinism. The Guardian recently reported on a story of two parents who debated whether to have a child with albinism, saying, “I was anxious about the impact on us of being parents and the perceptions of other people.”

The photographer’s series incorporates the gaze those with albinism are wont to experience, but in the series, they look right back at the viewers. Toying with pose, light and saturation, Lacerda creates an ethereal beauty where the light-drenched palette is coupled with a darker reality.

(via Huffington Post)

Photoset

theatlantic:

God’s Surgeons in Africa

In countries where many are performing surgery without any formal training, a Christian organization is educating surgeons who stay around despite little pay or prestige- sometimes despite real danger.

See more. [Images: Brian Till]

Photo
climateadaptation:

nevver:

Photos of the Year 2012, NatGeo

“The President” a 3,200 year-old giant sequoia tree in California. Note the person at the bottom of the tree.

climateadaptation:

nevver:

Photos of the Year 2012, NatGeo

“The President” a 3,200 year-old giant sequoia tree in California. Note the person at the bottom of the tree.

Photo
divineblu:

Pokot Girls by Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher
Source: (divineblu.tumblr.com)

divineblu:

Pokot Girls by Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher

Source: (divineblu.tumblr.com)

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angakingsining:

Kassapa Buddha
Photo
wickwareboisseau:

Pretty Nose, Cheyenne
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Knowledge Equals Black Power by knowledgeequalsblackpower.tumblr.com is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.