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October 29, 1929 - “Black Tuesday,” U.S. Stock Market crashes and triggers the Great Depression.

In 1929, the Great Depression devastated the United States. Hard times came to people throughout the country, especially rural blacks. Cotton prices plunged from eighteen to six cents a pound. Two thirds of some two million black farmers earned nothing or went into debt. Hundreds of thousands of sharecroppers left the land for the cities, leaving behind abandoned fields and homes. Even “Negro jobs” — jobs traditionally held by blacks, such as busboys, elevator operators, garbage men, porters, maids, and cooks — were sought by desperate unemployed whites. In Atlanta, Georgia, a Klan-like group called the Black Shirts paraded carrying signs that read, “No jobs for niggers until every white man has a job.” In other cities, people shouted “Niggers back to the cotton fields. City jobs are for white men.” And in Mississippi, where blacks traditionally held certain jobs on trains, several unemployed white men, seeking train jobs, ambushed and killed the black workers. 
The only group in the early years of the Depression that concerned itself with black rights of rural blacks was the Communist Party. The Party successfully fought to save the lives of the “Scottsboro Boys,” nine black youths falsely charged with rape in Alabama. Eight were sentenced to death. The Communists also organized interracial unions and demonstrations for relief, jobs, and end to evictions. Between Roosevelt’s election in 1932 and throughout most of his first term, neither the president nor the Congress paid much attention to the suffering of blacks. The President did not want to antagonize the Southern Senators who controlled the Senate and who could block his efforts to end the Depression. By the end of Roosevelt’s first term, the president’s thinking began to change thanks, in part, to the efforts of his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. Mrs. Roosevelt became profoundly aware of the injustices suffered by African Americans. She began to speak out publicly on behalf of blacks and against race prejudice. She became a go-between between civil rights activists and the President. As a result, Roosevelt began to publicly speak out against lynching and granted influential black leaders such as Mary McLeod Bethune access to the White House; these advisors were known as the “Black Cabinet.” Federal agencies began to open their doors to blacks, providing jobs, relief, farm subsidies, education, training, and participation in a variety of federal programs. The United States Supreme Court began to hand down decisions favoring black challenges to segregation. For the first time since Reconstruction, the federal government actively supported blacks and made a concerted effort to incorporate them into the mainstream of American life. Black voters responded to the change of heart of the Roosevelt administration by switching their political allegiance from the Republican Party to the Democratic. And black civil-rights organizations began to increase their activity and demands for their rights as citizens of the United States.  (via PBS)

October 29, 1929 - “Black Tuesday,” U.S. Stock Market crashes and triggers the Great Depression.

In 1929, the Great Depression devastated the United States. Hard times came to people throughout the country, especially rural blacks. Cotton prices plunged from eighteen to six cents a pound. Two thirds of some two million black farmers earned nothing or went into debt. Hundreds of thousands of sharecroppers left the land for the cities, leaving behind abandoned fields and homes. Even “Negro jobs” — jobs traditionally held by blacks, such as busboys, elevator operators, garbage men, porters, maids, and cooks — were sought by desperate unemployed whites. In Atlanta, Georgia, a Klan-like group called the Black Shirts paraded carrying signs that read, “No jobs for niggers until every white man has a job.” In other cities, people shouted “Niggers back to the cotton fields. City jobs are for white men.” And in Mississippi, where blacks traditionally held certain jobs on trains, several unemployed white men, seeking train jobs, ambushed and killed the black workers.

The only group in the early years of the Depression that concerned itself with black rights of rural blacks was the Communist Party. The Party successfully fought to save the lives of the “Scottsboro Boys,” nine black youths falsely charged with rape in Alabama. Eight were sentenced to death. The Communists also organized interracial unions and demonstrations for relief, jobs, and end to evictions. 

Between Roosevelt’s election in 1932 and throughout most of his first term, neither the president nor the Congress paid much attention to the suffering of blacks. The President did not want to antagonize the Southern Senators who controlled the Senate and who could block his efforts to end the Depression. By the end of Roosevelt’s first term, the president’s thinking began to change thanks, in part, to the efforts of his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. Mrs. Roosevelt became profoundly aware of the injustices suffered by African Americans. She began to speak out publicly on behalf of blacks and against race prejudice. She became a go-between between civil rights activists and the President. As a result, Roosevelt began to publicly speak out against lynching and granted influential black leaders such as Mary McLeod Bethune access to the White House; these advisors were known as the “Black Cabinet.” Federal agencies began to open their doors to blacks, providing jobs, relief, farm subsidies, education, training, and participation in a variety of federal programs. The United States Supreme Court began to hand down decisions favoring black challenges to segregation. For the first time since Reconstruction, the federal government actively supported blacks and made a concerted effort to incorporate them into the mainstream of American life. Black voters responded to the change of heart of the Roosevelt administration by switching their political allegiance from the Republican Party to the Democratic. And black civil-rights organizations began to increase their activity and demands for their rights as citizens of the United States.  (via PBS)

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They’re really trying to act like this shutdown isn’t their fault? That’s crazy. 

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These people are fucking psychos. I guess as soon as you’re dead, they can start making up shit about who you were. 

(Source: assholeofday, via silas216)

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"McCain said he didn’t agree with fellow Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, who argued Friday the Obama administration is calling for a review of “stand your ground” laws as a way to further its agenda against Second Amendment rights.

Isn’t it time for America to come together?” McCain asked. I’d rather have a message of coming together and discussing these issues rather than condemning.

I respect (Cruz’s) view, but I don’t frankly see the connection,” he added."

Sen. John McCain calls for review of ‘stand your ground’ laws – CNN (via brooklynmutt)

(via brooklynmutt)

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socialismartnature:

8-year-old follows Tenn. lawmaker around Capitol until he drops anti-child welfare bill

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A Tennessee lawmaker has relented and agreed to drop his bill linking academic performance to the family’s welfare benefits after an 8-year-old girl shamed him by following him around the state Capitol.

On his way to vote on Thursday, state Sen. Stacey Campfield (R) was confronted by 8-year-old homeschooler Aamira Fetuga, who presented him with a petition signed by people opposing his welfare bill, according to the Tennessean. Nearby, a choir of about 60 activists sang “Jesus Loves the Little Children.”

“You are so weak, to not listen to a child,” a parent said as Campfield walked away with the girl following.

“Why do you want to cut benefits for people?” 8-year-old Fetuga asked after she caught up with him on a Capitol escalator.

“Well, I wouldn’t as long as the parent shows up to school and goes to two parent-teacher conferences and they’re exempt,” the state Senator explained.

The confrontation continued during what appeared to be long, uncomfortable walk to the Senate floor for Campfield.

“Using children as props is shameful,” he grumbled at one point.

But the protest tactics may have worked because Campfield decided to withdraw the bill before Thursday’s vote after several other former supporters began to express doubts.

You can say that withholding the money from the parents doesn’t harm the child, but you’re fooling yourself,” Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris (R) pointed out.

Under Campfield’s bill, families could have lost up to 30 percent of welfare benefits from the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program if a child did not attend school regularly and make “satisfactory academic progress.”

Campfield, however, said he was not giving up on the idea. He asked the state Senate to further study the bill, giving him the opportunity to bring it back up next year.

“To me, it’s not a dead issue at all,” he told reporters. “This may be a slight detour, but honestly I think this could hopefully make it even better.”

As for the protests, Campfield remarked, “It is what it is.”

“There’s always going to be detractors.”

Watch this video from The Tennessean, broadcast April 12, 2013.

You heard that people… they’re just going to repackage it and bring it out next year. So, be ready.

And I love this little girl! 

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mediamattersforamerica:

Video here. 
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(Source: sandandglass, via silas216)

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therewerebirds:

In other news, a 2011 poll shows that only 40% of republicans in Mississippi think interracial marriage should be legal.

Reblogging again for the link. WTF? 
This is why my step-father told me not to stop (not even for gas) when I’m driving through those states… He told me a terrible story about him driving through Mississippi (heading to New Orleans). Long story short, he had to pretend that he had a gun in his back pocket for them to leave him alone, and this was just a few years ago. 

therewerebirds:

In other news, a 2011 poll shows that only 40% of republicans in Mississippi think interracial marriage should be legal.

Reblogging again for the link. WTF? 

This is why my step-father told me not to stop (not even for gas) when I’m driving through those states… He told me a terrible story about him driving through Mississippi (heading to New Orleans). Long story short, he had to pretend that he had a gun in his back pocket for them to leave him alone, and this was just a few years ago. 

(Source: stupiduglyfatcunt, via stupiduglyfatcunt)

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inothernews:

The Romneys are the sound of one hand facepalming.

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