Photoset

dynamicafrica:

The iconic images that came to define the Soweto Uprising of June 16th, 1976.

This series of images depict scenes of a tragic moment that has come to symbolize this day in South African history.

As planned on June 16th, 1976, students from schools around Soweto began to gather and protest against a policy by the South African government that, through a system they called ‘Bantu Education’, that forced black students from the 7th grade onwards to be taught lessons in Afrikaans. Not only was this policy impractical as many students had little to no knowledge in Afrikaans which made learning subjects in high school difficult, Afrikaans was a language that symbolized oppression and the racist authority of the apartheid government.

Armed mostly with their new found confidence and attitudes of defiance cultivated by the Black Consciousness rhetoric sweeping the country, the students had planned that these protests would be a peaceful demonstration. The mass rally had been planned in secret by the Students formed an Action Committee (later known as the Soweto Students’ Representative Council) on June 13th, 1976, with student Teboho “Tsietsi” Mashinini as the main leader of the protests.

On the day, between 10, 000 - 50, 000 students began to make their way, as planned, to the Orlando Stadium in Soweto. Many of the participants were only notified of the rally on the day of the event. According to his sister, Antoinette Sithole, 13-year-old Hector Pieterson found himself there more out of curiosity out of anything else. Unfortunately, it was at this time that things began to take a violent turn. Police, who were heavily armed, began releasing their dogs on the crowds. But the crowd was large and many protestors overpowered the animals. After this, the police began to shoot into the crowd of unarmed students. One of the first causalities recorded on that day was the young Hector Pieterson.  

More and more victims were killed on that day, and one such individual was Dr. Melville Edelstein, a white social worker in Soweto who had devoted his life to providing healthcare to many in the area. Unfortunately, Dr. Edelstein was the “victim of the consequences of the apartheid system – a racist system which socialized South Africans to impulsively judge and respond to one another not as individuals with individual qualities, but according to a stereotypical image based solely on skin colour.”

Taken by South African photographer Sam Nzima, the first image was published in newspapers around the world the following day and has become one of the most iconic images of South African history.

(via stupiduglyfatcunt)

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descentintotyranny:

U.S. Apartheid Abuse Cases Against Ford, IBM Go Ahead
Apr. 18 2014
A federal judge on Thursday declined to toss out decade-old lawsuits that accuse IBM Corp. and Ford Motor Co. of supporting apartheid by letting their subsidiaries sell computers and cars to the South African government.
The three lawsuits seek to hold IBM and Ford responsible for race-based injustices including rape, torture and murder under apartheid, a system of race-based segregation and discrimination against nonwhites that ended 20 years ago.
The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled on the legal reach of the statute under which the plaintiffs are suing, the Alien Tort Statute. The 1789 statute originally was enacted to prosecute pirates and was revived in recent decades to permit lawsuits in the United States against those who violate human rights abroad.
Thursday’s ruling from Judge Shira Scheindlin in Manhattan allows plaintiffs to file amended complaints that fit within the reach ruled upon by the Supreme Court.
Emails seeking comment from Armonk-based IBM and Dearborn, Michigan-based Ford weren’t immediately answered.
Close to 80 companies initially were named in the lawsuits, filed about 12 years ago, and the vast majority of those claims were rejected.
A district judge threw out the lawsuits in 2004, saying he did not have jurisdiction. He noted that Congress had supported and encouraged business investment in South Africa as a way to achieve greater respect for human rights and a reduction in poverty. And he cited vigorous objections to the lawsuits by the U.S. and its allies.
The U.S. had said the lawsuits posed a foreign policy problem, threatening to inflame U.S. relations with South Africa. The South African government had said the cases interfered with its rights to litigate such claims itself, though it later reversed its position.

descentintotyranny:

U.S. Apartheid Abuse Cases Against Ford, IBM Go Ahead

Apr. 18 2014

A federal judge on Thursday declined to toss out decade-old lawsuits that accuse IBM Corp. and Ford Motor Co. of supporting apartheid by letting their subsidiaries sell computers and cars to the South African government.

The three lawsuits seek to hold IBM and Ford responsible for race-based injustices including rape, torture and murder under apartheid, a system of race-based segregation and discrimination against nonwhites that ended 20 years ago.

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled on the legal reach of the statute under which the plaintiffs are suing, the Alien Tort Statute. The 1789 statute originally was enacted to prosecute pirates and was revived in recent decades to permit lawsuits in the United States against those who violate human rights abroad.

Thursday’s ruling from Judge Shira Scheindlin in Manhattan allows plaintiffs to file amended complaints that fit within the reach ruled upon by the Supreme Court.

Emails seeking comment from Armonk-based IBM and Dearborn, Michigan-based Ford weren’t immediately answered.

Close to 80 companies initially were named in the lawsuits, filed about 12 years ago, and the vast majority of those claims were rejected.

A district judge threw out the lawsuits in 2004, saying he did not have jurisdiction. He noted that Congress had supported and encouraged business investment in South Africa as a way to achieve greater respect for human rights and a reduction in poverty. And he cited vigorous objections to the lawsuits by the U.S. and its allies.

The U.S. had said the lawsuits posed a foreign policy problem, threatening to inflame U.S. relations with South Africa. The South African government had said the cases interfered with its rights to litigate such claims itself, though it later reversed its position.

Tags: south africa
Video

dynamicafrica:

Big Debate on Racism: Has the Rainbow Nation project failed in South Africa?

The tension in this debating arena is so thick, you’d need a chainsaw to cut through it and even so, you may not be able to slice through it. But all this comes as no surprise considering the topic of the conversation, as well as the time and place in which it is held.

Operating around the question: “Has the Rainbow Nation failed?”, South African hot topic debating program eNCA’s “The Big Debate South Africa" (a favourite of mine) hosts yet another riveting discussion on race relations in the "Rainbow Nation" 20 years after a democratic country was born. 

With a diverse panel and even more diverse audience members, the question yields a colourful array of responses. A multitude of topics and issues are raised throughout ranging from white privilege, white poverty, and the layered politics of power, to affirmative action, the exclusion or underrepresenation of coloured and Indian populations in South African internal race relations, the intersectionality of race, class and gender, and the failure of the broader reconciliation movement of the 90s.

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All Africa, All the time.

(via muzungus)

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readabookson:

https://anonfiles.com/file/b1d7fa088b1ff58597a69485cb87ab51

I really want to read this. Right before I went to South Africa in 2008, there were many xenophobic attacks against immigrants from neighboring African countries. 
For the most part, I never saw or encountered anything….  except for this one night. My friend Crystal took us out in Capetown (I think it was a “colored” club. Crystal is colored.. and I think everyone there was light-skinned and/or white looking) and this one group of people kept on bumping into me and our other American friends (my friends are dark skinned with locs/braids) and spilling drinks on us. Finally, Crystal confronts them and one bold bitch was like “Well tell your friends to go back to Zimbabwe!”
And Crystal was like “Bitch, they’re American!!!!!” She was like “oh…. “ 
-______-
Then, they slowly migrated away from us and left us alone.
That Western privilege, eh?  But I never understood why, even if we were from Zimbabwe, people would spill drinks on us. Like… why???? What were they trying to accomplish? Just trying to make someone feel unwelcomed I suppose.

readabookson:

https://anonfiles.com/file/b1d7fa088b1ff58597a69485cb87ab51

I really want to read this. Right before I went to South Africa in 2008, there were many xenophobic attacks against immigrants from neighboring African countries. 

For the most part, I never saw or encountered anything….  except for this one night. My friend Crystal took us out in Capetown (I think it was a “colored” club. Crystal is colored.. and I think everyone there was light-skinned and/or white looking) and this one group of people kept on bumping into me and our other American friends (my friends are dark skinned with locs/braids) and spilling drinks on us. Finally, Crystal confronts them and one bold bitch was like “Well tell your friends to go back to Zimbabwe!”

And Crystal was like “Bitch, they’re American!!!!!” She was like “oh…. “ 

-______-

Then, they slowly migrated away from us and left us alone.

That Western privilege, eh?  But I never understood why, even if we were from Zimbabwe, people would spill drinks on us. Like… why???? What were they trying to accomplish? Just trying to make someone feel unwelcomed I suppose.

Video

ethiopienne:

That Time Reagan Vetoed the Anti-Apartheid Act

As Vijay Prashad points out, many of the world’s leaders that are apparently mourning the death of Nelson Mandela were the “same people opposed [to] freedom in South Africa to the very end.” 

Although Ronald Reagan has passed away himself, one can imagine he might salute Mandela today. But as president, Reagan worked against Mandela, so much so that he vetoed the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act in 1986. Believing that he knew what was best for black people living under apartheid in South Africa, Reagan opposed sanctions and wanted to maintain friendly relations with the white supremacist government.

South Africa’s Desmond Tutu disagreed. Watch this 1986 news report about Tutu’s visit to the White House, in which Tutu explains the way that Reagan failed black South Africans.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

Photoset
Tags: SOUTH AFRICA
Photoset

iluvsouthernafrica:

Focus on the Mine Workers and Mining Industry of Southern Africa

Two books I highly recommend regarding the above topic.

1.  The Scramble for Africa - Thomas Pakenham

2.  The Randlords - Geoffrey Wheatcroft

Both books are well researched and incredibly thorough but very difficult to read in that they will break your heart whilst helping you see why Southern Africa is as it is.  More to come…

Video

femalerappers:

Queen Latifah ft. Monie Love - Ladies First

I dedicate this to those who think womanism is destroying the Black community.

Text

It’s truly astounding.

I cannot believe White people outside of South Africa actually sympathize with White Afrikaners and believe this myth about them being oppressed.

Like you can’t be serious to pick the one White group in the world where Black people just gained some freedom, and tell me there is a genocide against Whites now. That’s ludicrous. How can you be so willing to believe that White people could be undergoing a genocide in South Africa. Do you know what a genocide is?

You think that’s happening to white people in South Africa? How you gonna project your fear of Black revenge out there on display for everyone to see…..? 

White people are vacationing in Black townships as cultural experiments. They’re still segregating themselves!  Do they look under threat of a genocide???.

I’m American. I know it’s people struggling harder than me. And you can call me out on that… but then again, you mistake this for “The Oppressed Olympics.” It’s not that. It’s me fighting for what’s mine as a human being. But if you do wanna play that game, for Christ’s sake, do not let White South Africans be your example. That’s just a terrible example. Let it be some other community…. basically any other community.

You don’t understand how often my friends and I were harassed when we were there (I especially witnessed more harassing towards my dark skinned friends.) You just ruined my day with that bs. 

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Video

dynamicafrica:

TODAY’S CLASSIC TUNE: Lebo Mathosa - Ntozabantu

Today would’ve been Lebo Mathosa’s 36th birthday.

The former Boom Shaka member and highly successful solo artist, who began her professional music career at the age of 15 and was able to forge her way through an industry dominated by men, passed away in 2006 at the age of 29 after her driver lost control of the vehicle they were in.

After leaving her kwaito group Boom Shaka in 1999, starting out as a member of the four-piece in 1994, she went solo and her debut album Dream achieved gold status after only four weeks. At the 2001 South African Music Awards (SAMAs) Mathosa went home with the Best Dance Album award for Dream, Best Female Vocalist award, and Best Dance Single award for her first release, Intro, off of the same album.

She was also nominated for a British MOBO Award in 2006.

Known for her signature dyed hair, charming and outspoken attitude, Mathosa was openly bisexual - all characteristics that often saw her being compared to the late Brenda Fassie.

The above song is one of my all-time favourite Lebo Mathosa songs, and I had the pleasure of meeting her briefly at a concert a few months before she passed.

RIP Lebo Mathosa, you are missed!

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