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cartermagazine:

Today In Black History
‘Josiah Thomas Walls was born enslaved on December 30, 1842, on the plantation of Dr. John Walls in Winchester, Virginia. He became the first Black Congressman to represent an entire state (Florida).’
(photo: Josiah Thomas Walls)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In Black History

‘Josiah Thomas Walls was born enslaved on December 30, 1842, on the plantation of Dr. John Walls in Winchester, Virginia. He became the first Black Congressman to represent an entire state (Florida).’

(photo: Josiah Thomas Walls)

- CARTER Magazine

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cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor John Oliver Killens
‘John Oliver Killens’ politically charged novels earned him two Pulitzer Prize nominations, and his works of fiction and nonfiction have been translated into more than a dozen languages. An influential essayist, screenwriter and teacher, he co-founded the important Harlem Writers Guild and worked as a teacher and lecturer at many schools and universities, including Fisk, Howard, and Columbia.’ via Georgia Writers Hall of Fame
(photo: John Oliver Killens)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor John Oliver Killens

‘John Oliver Killens’ politically charged novels earned him two Pulitzer Prize nominations, and his works of fiction and nonfiction have been translated into more than a dozen languages. An influential essayist, screenwriter and teacher, he co-founded the important Harlem Writers Guild and worked as a teacher and lecturer at many schools and universities, including Fisk, Howard, and Columbia.’ via Georgia Writers Hall of Fame

(photo: John Oliver Killens)

- CARTER Magazine

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cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Ed Bradley
‘Journalist Ed Bradley spent 26 years on TV as a member of the 60 Minutes team, winning 19 Emmy Awards along the way.’
(photo: Ed Bradley)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Ed Bradley

‘Journalist Ed Bradley spent 26 years on TV as a member of the 60 Minutes team, winning 19 Emmy Awards along the way.’

(photo: Ed Bradley)

- CARTER Magazine

(via fearfullymade-locs)

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cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Althea Gibson, the first Black Wimbledon champion, was born in Silver, SC, on this date August 25, 1927.’
(photo: Althea Gibson)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Althea Gibson, the first Black Wimbledon champion, was born in Silver, SC, on this date August 25, 1927.’

(photo: Althea Gibson)

- CARTER Magazine

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cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Miriam Zensi Makeba, internationally renowned singer and South Africa native, pleaded with the United Nations to begin a complete boycott of South Africa on this date July 16, 1963. Makeba said that a ban on arms should be the first action taken.’
(photo: Miriam Zensi Makeba)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Miriam Zensi Makeba, internationally renowned singer and South Africa native, pleaded with the United Nations to begin a complete boycott of South Africa on this date July 16, 1963. Makeba said that a ban on arms should be the first action taken.’

(photo: Miriam Zensi Makeba)

- CARTER Magazine

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cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Thurgood Marshall was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson on this date June 13, 1967. Marshall became the Supreme Court’s first Black Associate Justice.’
(photo: Thurgood Marshall)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Thurgood Marshall was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson on this date June 13, 1967. Marshall became the Supreme Court’s first Black Associate Justice.’

(photo: Thurgood Marshall)

- CARTER Magazine

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todaysdocument:


Closing of the Jerome Relocation Center, Denson, Arkansas. A typical truck load of Jerome residents waiting to be put on the train for transfer to the Gila River Center. 06/13/1944
Charles E. Mace, photographer.  From the Central Photographic File of the War Relocation Authority

In 1942, the Jerome Relocation Center was the last camp to be opened and it was the first to be closed on June 30, 1944.  

todaysdocument:

Closing of the Jerome Relocation Center, Denson, Arkansas. A typical truck load of Jerome residents waiting to be put on the train for transfer to the Gila River Center. 06/13/1944

Charles E. Mace, photographer.  From the Central Photographic File of the War Relocation Authority

In 1942, the Jerome Relocation Center was the last camp to be opened and it was the first to be closed on June 30, 1944.  

Photo
cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Andrew Cailloux, a Black captain, was a major figure in the First and Third Native Guards’ assaults on rebel positions at Port Hudson, LA, (a Civil War battle) on this date May 27, 1863. This victory helped the Union gain control of the Mississippi River.’
(picture: Creole Officers of the Louisiana Native Guards)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Andrew Cailloux, a Black captain, was a major figure in the First and Third Native Guards’ assaults on rebel positions at Port Hudson, LA, (a Civil War battle) on this date May 27, 1863. This victory helped the Union gain control of the Mississippi River.’

(picture: Creole Officers of the Louisiana Native Guards)

- CARTER Magazine

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Harmony Community, Putnam County, Georgia…. This old woman was a slave and belonged to the family on whose place she now lives. She was a small girl when Sherman’s Army came through. 05/28/1941 - 06/01/1941
Irving Rusinow, photographer.  From the Photographic records of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Harmony Community, Putnam County, Georgia…. This old woman was a slave and belonged to the family on whose place she now lives. She was a small girl when Sherman’s Army came through. 05/28/1941 - 06/01/1941

Irving Rusinow, photographer.  From the Photographic records of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

(via todaysdocument)

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